Tag Archives: darkroom

Carbon Printing Workshop

Join us for a hands-on introduction to the rare carbon transfer process! In this alternative photographic process, finely ground pigment creates a unique image quality and tonal range. The prints beg to be held in your hands to appreciate their texture and reflection of light.

Though carbon printing is notoriously difficult, with this class you can learn from a contemporary practitioner who has ironed out all the kinks. Dennis Collins has spent years perfecting his process, and now would like to share his knowledge with you!

The skills acquired in this class will provide you with the knowledge necessary to explore the possibilities of your artwork in this medium. This class is open to photographers of all levels, though some darkroom practice is beneficial.

Prior to the workshop students will need to provide a digital image containing highlight, mid-tone and shadow detail from which a digital image will be made for contact printing the size of a 4×5 print. More details will be provided upon registration.

Students will take home a glass and squeegee set at the end of the workshop to continue their exploration of carbon printing at home.

About Dennis
With over 30 years of experience as a Corporate Photographer, Dennis Collins’ interests now lie in the timeless beauty of carbon printing. While earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan he focused on alternative processes.

Dennis has painstakingly embraced carbon printing, a particularly difficult and rare process, and he passionately wants to share this knowledge with others in the hope this art form will continue. When not in the darkroom, Dennis enjoys spending time with his family, volunteering at Art Intersection and Infinity Hospice, and car racing.

 

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Mordançage with Jace Becker

We got experimental in the lab this weekend during our Mordançage workshop with Jace Becker! This free-form, intuitive process process physically lifts the darkest parts of a silver gelatin emulsion, forming delicate veils. The veils can be manipulated or removed, allowing for endless creative opportunities. Our participants played around with a variety of techniques, achieving one-of-a-kind results with each print.

Jace demonstrated processing silver gelatin prints in mordançage solution, water rinsing baths, and developer. The mordançage chemistry bleaches the prints as it’s lifting the emulsion, requiring the print to be re-developed to bring back the image.

After the print has been washed, the lifted gelatin emulsion can be manipulated to add visual interest, motion, or abstract shapes to the image. We used cotton balls, hypodermic needles filled with water, compressed air, and hairdryers to place the veils exactly where we wanted them to go. 

This print is slowly being re-developed – the tan parts of the print were originally black!

Cesar Laure had some interesting results with this half-mordançaged photogram – the altered portion of the print is on the right.

Beautiful print by Susan Berger

Prints by Suzanne Fallender displaying a range of different colors achieved by placing developing prints out in the sunlight.

We can’t wait to see what our students make with this process!

Mordançage Workshop with Jace Becker

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the fascinating 19th century bleach/etch process of Mordançage. Each student will be instructed concerning the history, process, and various techniques in which to produce engaging imagery within the medium. Mordançage produces wonderfully evocative imagery, and the possibilities for experimentation are nearly endless. The knowledge and skills acquired in this class will equip you in the development of self-expression and provide an opportunity for intuitive applications in your own artistic practice. All students must be prepared to experiment, be creative, but most importantly to have fun! 

The course is intended for intermediate to advanced photographers only, as each student must possess a foundation in the fundamentals of gelatin silver darkroom printing techniques prior to enrollment. If you are new to darkroom printing or would like a refresher course, check out our 1-on-1 Tutorials.

Though there will be time to make new prints during the workshop, students will benefit from bringing at least 20 finished gelatin silver prints and a large range of negatives to experiment with this process. More details will be provided upon registration.

About Mordançage
Mordançage is a mystifyingly beautiful method of altering gelatin silver prints or negatives with endless opportunities for experimentation and creative application. Mordançage chemistry physically lifts the darkest parts of the photographic emulsion from the rest of the image, allowing it to be manipulated into veils or removed completely. This rare 19th century process was largely forgotten, but fortunately was revived by 20th and 21st century practitioners Jean-Pierre Sudre and Elizabeth Opalenik. Try it yourself and prepare to be amazed at the possibilities this process will introduce to your artistic practice!

Jace Becker

About Jace
Jace Becker earned degrees in photography and anthropology from Montana State University, and is currently a 3rd year MFA candidate in Photography at Arizona State. His work focuses on the cultural landscape, specifically social and self-exploration, issues of identity, vulnerability, and the darker sides of introspection. His area of emphasis is in alternative processes. When he is not hiding from the Arizona sun in his darkroom, he is an avid rock climber, surfer, and lover of sailing.

Jace Becker

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Exploring Photography and the Darkroom

In our Exploring Photography and Darkroom Photography for Teens summer camps we experimented with all the possibilities of photography!

Our Exploring Photography students shot images on 35mm film, processed it themselves, and printed their images in the darkroom – many of them for the first time ever. They also took digital pictures, edited them in Adobe Photoshop, and made beautiful inkjet prints of their photos. They learned manual SLR camera functions like ISO, shutter speed, and aperture, which are used in both film and digital capture, and played around with composition, lighting, and varying perspectives. With these tools, our students are ready to dig deeper into their preferred photographic medium and really become pros!

Our Darkroom Photography students shot 35mm, 120mm, and even 4×5″ film, spanning the range of film formats from casual to professional. They each captured photos relating to a project concept of their own choosing, allowing them to flex their artistic muscles in finding or creating images. Once they processed all that film, they put in some dedicated time in the darkroom printing their work, even learning advanced techniques like split-filter printing. In the end, each student left with 3-4 perfect prints for their portfolio.

At the end of all our photography camps we pin up everyone’s work from the week and reflect on our successes and challenges. It’s at this time that the immense creative drive and talent our students posses really shines. 

We had a blast this summer sharing our love of photography with young artists! 

 

Tri-Color Gum Bichromate – Round 2

Our first Tri-Color Gum Bichromate workshop with Diana Bloomfield last September was such a hit, we decided to do it all again! This past Saturday and Sunday Diana led nine students through this labor-intensive and difficult process. The workshop included many first-time gum printers, and despite the tricky nature of the process, all produced fantastic prints! As we gathered around to look at everyone’s completed work at the end of the two days, one thing was apparent: there is nothing like the magic of gum printing, and no one better to teach it than Diana Bloomfield!

We are grateful for all of our students, but we especially would like to extend a big THANK YOU to our four class participants who travelled from far, far away to take this workshop with us – Cary from Alaska, Timothy from Michigan, and Scott and Kelly from Pennsylvania. We’re so glad you could join us!

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Diana discusses digital negatives during her demonstration at the beginning of the workshop

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Diana “develops” an exposed print in water

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Diana discusses the cyan-layer exposure she demonstrated as it hangs to dry – Terry, the student who provided the negative for this print, will later add yellow and magenta layers

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Janet washes out her print after exposing the yellow layer

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Karen coats her paper with a mixture of watercolor pigment suspended in potassium dichromate and gum arabic. The potassium dichromate hardens the gum arabic upon exposure to UV light; the parts of the coating blocked by the negative remain soft and wash away in water.

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Tim washes out his print

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Kelly very carefully registers the negative for her next layer

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Janet, Tom, and Matthew attend to their prints

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Each layer of pigment make a big impact when gum printing. The print on the left includes cyan, yellow, and magenta layers; the print on the right includes cyan and yellow. Both prints by Karen Hymer

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Diana discusses the finished prints one by one with the class

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Karen, Diana, and Tom mask off the brush-marked border of Cary King’s image in order to look at the print without visual distractions

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Scott Wrage shares his tri-color print, not yet dry enough to pin up, with the rest of the class

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Prints clockwise from left by Matthew Covarrubius, Kelly Wrage, Karen Hymer, and Timothy Wells

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Diana Bloomfield Teaches Tri-Color Gum Bichromate Workshop

This past weekend of September 12 and 13 Art Intersection was bursting with color! Tri-color gum bichromate, that is. We had the great pleasure of hosting a two-day, immersive workshop in the process taught by Diana Bloomfield, a master gum printer especially known for her tri-color technique. Ten participants learned about this fascinating 19th-century process that includes mixing together gum arabic, potassium dichromate, and watercolor pigments, then hand-coating that mixture on paper, exposing their paper under a digital negative in UV light, and washing out the print in water to “develop” it.

Diana Bloomfield explains her technique for mixing the gum emulsion on Day 1.

Workshop participants look on as Diana coats a sheet of paper with the light-sensitive gum mixture she’s made.

Any color watercolor pigment can be used, but this tri-color process involves making three separate coating and exposure runs with cyan, magenta, and yellow pigments individually to get a full-color final print.

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Armed with coffee, the participants listen as Diana explains the basics of color balancing for a natural-looking print at the start of Day 2. If a print does not initially look correct, more passes with various colors can be made to balance it.

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In order for the image to remain sharp, the negative being used must be placed in exactly the same spot for every layer. Michael Puff carefully registers his negative to exactly match the previous layers he’s created.

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Chris Palmer rinses out his print after exposing it to UV light. During the exposure, the areas of the gum emulsion blocked by the dark areas of the negative wash away in the water, creating highlights. Those underneath the light areas of the negative solidify and adhere to the paper, creating shadows.

BK Skaggs, Shari Trennert, and Maylee Noah rinse their prints while others hang to dry. These prints show the first pass with the cyan layer.

At the end of the workshop, all the participants show the results of their hard work by putting their favorite prints up on the critique board. Diana gives the class constructive feedback on their printing.

Finished prints by Maylee Noah showing one-color, two-color, and tri-color prints.

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Ambrotype Open Studio

This is a follow-up lab for participants of the Ambrotye Workshop at Art Intersection wanting dedicated time to practice glass plate photography under the assistance of Claire Warden. Claire will be available to answer questions and help you create your own ambrotypes.

Glass plates for this open lab day must be purchased at Art Intersection, 4″x5″ plates for $5 each or 8″ x 10″ plates for $20 each.  These plates fit the carrier for the Art Intersection 4×5 and 8×10 cameras, or you can bring your own camera. Collodion chemistry is included in the price of the glass plates.

The lab includes softbox continuous lighting in the studio.

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Platinum Workshop with Keith Schreiber

Starting Friday evening and working through Sunday, the workshop students learned about creating digital negatives for platinum/palladium, chemistry, and then made prints in the alt process lab.

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Keith shared his expertise with the class and showed the process he uses to make palladium and platinum prints. You may remember Keith’s work on exhibit in the North Gallery along with Dick Arentz this past January and February during the Art Intersection Platinum/Palladium exhibition.

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Checking the first digital negatives for densities and checking exposure times.

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Keith concentrating on building and explaining digital negatives and Quad Tone RIP.

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Discussing paper choices.

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Ready to print.

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Coating Arches Platine with a glass rod.

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Time to expose.

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High tech or low tech, it’s all about UV light.

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Pouring on the developer.

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Trying the cold tone developer.

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Clearing.

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In the final wash.

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Final prints drying before going to the critique wall.

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Some of the dry prints on the critique wall. Others were still too wet to show by the end of the workshop.

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Printing out Paper Workshop

This past Saturday and Sunday were filled with mixing, coating, exposing, clearing, and toning.

Amazing results and sometimes surprises along the way of creating images with Colloide-Chloride Printing out Paper, PoP, in a workshop led by Siegfried Rempel. Once a popular commercial method to create images, today we hand coat paper to bring this process back to life and make beautiful, crisp, warm toned images.

We broke into a verse of Love Potion Number 9; “mix it up right here in sink, smells like turpentine, and looks like india ink.”


The use of Collodion in photography for the production of photographic prints an be found as early as the 1850s. The concept of an “emulsion” of silver salts in a collodion binder was introduced by Gaudin in 1853 and by 1861 he was actively producing the “Photogene” collodion emulsion. The collodio-chloride print-out-process represents one of the last PoP processes popular in North America and Europe with commercial photographers from the 1880s until WW II.

The Collodio-Chloride emulsion is coated on paper and the resulting image, contact printed under bright daylight, remains in the collodion layer. The process requires exposure under bright daylight and the image darkens or “prints out” during exposure.

Chris made a 4″ x 5″ glass plate negative using the PoP coating.

The over-exposed image is then processed to stabilize the image and provide the final print image, hence the term print-out-paper.

The collodion held together under processing to allow photo transfer.

A little dichromate for bleaching.

Final toning bath for a PoP image with a “platinum” look.

This workshop is another in the series of alternative process photography learn and create workshops at Art Intersection. In the past one-and-a-half years we have offered these alt-process workshops and demonstrations.

  • Cyanotype
  • VanDyke
  • Gum over Platinum
  • Albumen
  • Daguerreotype
  • Salt Prints

Stay tuned on our website and emails for more learn and create in the darkroom workshops.

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