Tag Archives: workshop

Hand-Coloring Photographs with Kate Breakey

Hand-coloring is as old as photography itself. In the 19th century, color tinting was applied to early black-and-white prints to make them more closely resemble reality; it was the advent of color films in the 1950s that took photographic hand-coloring techniques into the realm of interpretive artistic expression. Applying color has become a way for photographers to alter their images so that they become something other, something that can be more compelling and absolutely unique.

In this four-day workshop, you will be introduced to the many materials and techniques of hand-coloring, inspiring you to experiment with your own creative process.  You start with a digitally output print and then apply a variety of oil paints, pigments, pencils, and inks or pastels in combination, to extend the photographic image and produce the effects you want. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

Photography is a magical process, but the ‘hands on’ aspect of applying pigment is not only fun, it is meditation on the joy of ‘making’ something that comes from somewhere within.  

Lunch and all materials are included in the registration fee for this workshop.


About Kate
Kate Breakey is internationally known for her large-scale, richly hand-colored photographs including her acclaimed series of luminous portraits of birds, flowers and animals in an ongoing series called Small Deaths published in 2001 by University of Texas Press with a foreword by noted art critic, A. D. Coleman. Since 1980 her work has appeared in more than 100 one-person exhibitions and in over 50 group exhibitions in the US, France, Japan, Australia, China, and New Zealand.

Her work is held in many public institutions including the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University in San Marcos, the Austin Museum of Art, the Australian National Gallery in Canberra and the Osaka Museum in Osaka, Japan. Her third book, Painted Light, published by the University of Texas in 2010, is a career retrospective that encompasses a quarter century of prolific image making.

Kate Breakey

Her collection of photograms, entitled Las Sombras / The shadows was published by University of Texas Press in October 2012.   This series is a continuation of her lifetime investigation of the natural world which in her own words is ‘brimming with fantastic mysterious beautiful things.’

A native of South Australia, Kate moved to Austin, Texas in 1988. She completed a Master of Fine Art degree at the University of Texas in 1991 where she also taught photography in the Department of Art and Art History until 1997. In 1999, she moved to Tucson, Arizona. In 2004 she received the Photographer of the Year award from the Houston Center for Photography. She now regularly teaches at the Santa Fe Photographic workshops, and The Italy ‘Spirit into Matter’ workshops.

Her landscape images – selected from a life-time of photographing all over the world – were published by Etherton Gallery in a Catalogue entitled  Slow Light.  She also works with gold-leaf to produce a modern day versions of an archaic photographic process called an Orotone.

Kate Breakey

 

Kate Breakey

 

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Carbon Printing Workshop

Join us for a hands-on introduction to the rare carbon transfer process! In this alternative photographic process, finely ground pigment creates a unique image quality and tonal range. The prints beg to be held in your hands to appreciate their texture and reflection of light.

Though carbon printing is notoriously difficult, with this class you can learn from a contemporary practitioner who has ironed out all the kinks. Dennis Collins has spent years perfecting his process, and now would like to share his knowledge with you!

The skills acquired in this class will provide you with the knowledge necessary to explore the possibilities of your artwork in this medium. This class is open to photographers of all levels, though some darkroom practice is beneficial.

Prior to the workshop students will need to provide a digital image containing highlight, mid-tone and shadow detail from which a digital image will be made for contact printing the size of a 4×5 print. More details will be provided upon registration.

Students will take home a glass and squeegee set at the end of the workshop to continue their exploration of carbon printing at home.

About Dennis
With over 30 years of experience as a Corporate Photographer, Dennis Collins’ interests now lie in the timeless beauty of carbon printing. While earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan he focused on alternative processes.

Dennis has painstakingly embraced carbon printing, a particularly difficult and rare process, and he passionately wants to share this knowledge with others in the hope this art form will continue. When not in the darkroom, Dennis enjoys spending time with his family, volunteering at Art Intersection and Infinity Hospice, and car racing.

 

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Mordançage with Jace Becker

We got experimental in the lab this weekend during our Mordançage workshop with Jace Becker! This free-form, intuitive process process physically lifts the darkest parts of a silver gelatin emulsion, forming delicate veils. The veils can be manipulated or removed, allowing for endless creative opportunities. Our participants played around with a variety of techniques, achieving one-of-a-kind results with each print.

Jace demonstrated processing silver gelatin prints in mordançage solution, water rinsing baths, and developer. The mordançage chemistry bleaches the prints as it’s lifting the emulsion, requiring the print to be re-developed to bring back the image.

After the print has been washed, the lifted gelatin emulsion can be manipulated to add visual interest, motion, or abstract shapes to the image. We used cotton balls, hypodermic needles filled with water, compressed air, and hairdryers to place the veils exactly where we wanted them to go. 

This print is slowly being re-developed – the tan parts of the print were originally black!

Cesar Laure had some interesting results with this half-mordançaged photogram – the altered portion of the print is on the right.

Beautiful print by Susan Berger

Prints by Suzanne Fallender displaying a range of different colors achieved by placing developing prints out in the sunlight.

We can’t wait to see what our students make with this process!

Mordançage Workshop with Jace Becker

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the fascinating 19th century bleach/etch process of Mordançage. Each student will be instructed concerning the history, process, and various techniques in which to produce engaging imagery within the medium. Mordançage produces wonderfully evocative imagery, and the possibilities for experimentation are nearly endless. The knowledge and skills acquired in this class will equip you in the development of self-expression and provide an opportunity for intuitive applications in your own artistic practice. All students must be prepared to experiment, be creative, but most importantly to have fun! 

The course is intended for intermediate to advanced photographers only, as each student must possess a foundation in the fundamentals of gelatin silver darkroom printing techniques prior to enrollment. If you are new to darkroom printing or would like a refresher course, check out our 1-on-1 Tutorials.

Though there will be time to make new prints during the workshop, students will benefit from bringing at least 20 finished gelatin silver prints and a large range of negatives to experiment with this process. More details will be provided upon registration.

About Mordançage
Mordançage is a mystifyingly beautiful method of altering gelatin silver prints or negatives with endless opportunities for experimentation and creative application. Mordançage chemistry physically lifts the darkest parts of the photographic emulsion from the rest of the image, allowing it to be manipulated into veils or removed completely. This rare 19th century process was largely forgotten, but fortunately was revived by 20th and 21st century practitioners Jean-Pierre Sudre and Elizabeth Opalenik. Try it yourself and prepare to be amazed at the possibilities this process will introduce to your artistic practice!

Jace Becker

About Jace
Jace Becker earned degrees in photography and anthropology from Montana State University, and is currently a 3rd year MFA candidate in Photography at Arizona State. His work focuses on the cultural landscape, specifically social and self-exploration, issues of identity, vulnerability, and the darker sides of introspection. His area of emphasis is in alternative processes. When he is not hiding from the Arizona sun in his darkroom, he is an avid rock climber, surfer, and lover of sailing.

Jace Becker

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Exploring Photography for Teens – Session 2

In this workshop we will explore the fundamentals and foundations of photography with fun photo projects every day!

You will gain an overview of photographic techniques from digital capture and printing to black and white darkroom and historical processes.

You will use both digital and film cameras, print digitally and in the darkroom, and experiment with hand-coated alternative photographic methods.

Each student will leave with a collection of their artwork made during camp and be featured in an online exhibition at artintersection.com.

Students are welcome to bring their own cell phone/digital camera and film cameras OR use one provided by Art Intersection. 

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Exploring Photography for Teens – Session 1

 

In this workshop we will explore the fundamentals and foundations of photography with fun photo projects every day!

You will gain an overview of photographic techniques from digital capture and printing to black and white darkroom and historical processes.

You will use both digital and film cameras, print digitally and in the darkroom, and experiment with hand-coated alternative photographic methods.

Each student will leave with a collection of their artwork made during camp and be featured in an online exhibition at artintersection.com.

Students are welcome to bring their own cell phone/digital camera and film cameras OR use one provided by Art Intersection. 

There are two separate sessions of this summer camp

To register for Session 2 (July 11 – 14), click here.

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Photopolymer Gravure with Karen Hymer

Photogravure
Learn the art of photopolymer gravure printing in this one-day workshop! Using light-sensitive steel-backed Solarplates, participants will create 4 x 5 gravure etching prints from their photographs. This environmentally friendly process translates photographic detail into ink on paper with unparalleled beauty.

No prior experience with printmaking is required. All necessary aspects of printmaking will be discussed including choosing inks, papers, and wiping material. Wiping and inking techniques will be covered. Be prepared to marvel at the way your photograph is transformed through ink on paper!

The making of digital positives will be discussed, but for the workshop itself, please send one color or black and white image file (300 dpi at 10” on the long side) to be made into a digital positive prior to the workshop. An email with details will be provided once you are registered.

All materials for this workshop are included in the registration fee.

Here is a brief outline of the process that will be presented in this workshop:

  • Starting with your digital photograph, a 4 x 5 transparency positive will be made
  • The positive is then laid on top of the light sensitive polymer plate and exposed to UV light
  • Washing the plate in water etches the image onto the plate
  • Once hardened, the plate is hand inked using water-soluble intaglio inks
  • The inked plate is then run through an etching press onto dampened paper
  • You take home 3 photogravure prints of your image

Meet the instructor and get a preview of the process! Karen Hymer will be giving an artist lecture on Friday, April 7 from 6:30 – 8pm. This lecture is free and open to the public.

The day after the workshop, return to the studio to practice your skills in our Photogravure Open Studio on Sunday, April 9. Learn more and register here.

About Karen Hymer
Karen Hymer is an artist and educator based out of Tucson, Arizona. For the past three years she has ventured into the world of printmaking – exploring imagery in the form of photopolymer gravures. Her current work explores the effects of time on the human body and various plant life. Hymer’s richly detailed photogravures emphasize the interplay of texture, pattern, light and shadow in muted earth tones. The decontextualized close-ups of the body and decaying plants reveal a poetic beauty in these often over-looked subjects.

 

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Printing Out Paper Workshop

Printing out Paper, or PoP, makes an image by exposing a negative and paper to light without any chemical development. With a printing-out process, you can watch your image come to life during your exposure, rather than having to wait until it is processed! Used originally as a simplified field process without the need of a darkroom, today we use this handmade emulsion to create artful images with subtle and warm tonality.

This workshop begins on Friday night with a lecture and demo, where instructor Siegfried Rempel will discuss the history of collodio-chloride printing and demonstrate two different printing-out methods. Following on Saturday is a day of coating and printing your own hand fabricated, collodio-chloride printing out paper.

The day after the workshop, return to the lab to further refine your mastery of this process! We are hosting a PoP Open Studio on Sunday, March 26 from 9am – 3pm. More information here.

About Collodio-Chloride
The use of Collodion in photography for the production of photographic prints an be found as early as the 1850s, and is most commonly used in the Wet Plate Collodion process to produce tintypes and ambrotypes. The concept of an “emulsion” of silver salts in a collodion binder was introduced by Gaudin in 1853 and by 1861 he was actively producing the “Photogene” collodion emulsion.

The collodio-chloride print has a similar physical appearance to its gelatin counterparts and it can be difficult to tell them apart. In fact, modern gelatin silver darkroom papers evolved from this early printing method! Today, we still practice the collodio-chloride process because of the rich and beautiful tonality it imparts on our images.

 

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Platinum/Palladium with Michael T. Puff

Late last month we had the pleasure of hosting a Platinum/Palladium workshop in our Photographic Arts Lab led by San Francisco-based artist Michael T. Puff! A master of this luminous, tonally-rich process, Michael led our eleven participants in making gorgeous prints of their own images.

Platinum/Palladium printing, a photographic process invented in the 19th century,  has long been a favorite of alternative process photographers for its highly archival nature and infinite variations of gray tones as highlights shift to shadows. In the process Michael uses, ferric oxalate, palladium, and sodium chloroplatinate are mixed together, hand-brushed onto 100% cotton rag paper, exposed to UV light through a digital negative, and then processed with potassium oxalate and sodium thiosulfate. The end result is a handcrafted print that is estimated to retain its appearance for a thousand years!

Thank you to all of our wonderful participants, and of course to Michael for traveling to us to share his expertise!

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Michael instructs the class on mixing the chemicals and coating their paper

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The participants mark where the image portion of their digital negatives will be centered on their paper

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After exposing a coated piece of paper to UV light, Michael demonstrates developing the print

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Participants process their exposed prints

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Cyd looks at the class’s finished work at the end of the day

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Gorgeous work produced by the students pinned up on the critique board

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Michael talks about successes and things to work on with the students

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Beautiful work by Lloyd Matthews

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Luminous prints by Deb Alberty

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A delicate, icy print by our very own Business Manager, Debra Wilson!